What About The Fungus

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Rarmstrong
What About The Fungus

As part of a team also working with PFAs and understanding how best to remove them from water, I find your work extremely fascinating and ingenious! I am curious what you plan to do with the fungus once it has broken down all the PFAs in the specified area? Additionally, will the byproducts of the decomposition of the PFAs form hazardous waste for people consuming the water? Thank you and good luck with the rest of your project.

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Rdiaz

Thanks for the comment. It is a challenging project, the goal of the project is to break the C-F bond, once the fluoride is in free form it can be precipitated using calcium due to the high affinity of fluoride for calcium. Calcium fluoride is a natural form found in nature not considered toxic. The PFAS would likely follow a biodegradation pathway with precursors that can be toxic to living creatures just like the PFAS, but if the fungus/bacteria can break one of the bonds, then it is likely that can break more of the C-F bonds until the entire compound is broken.

Khin

Great research idea to break down PFAS compounds with different fungi and bacterial strains. I would assume that these organisms are not virulent and easy to remove from the drinking water. Best wishes to the team.

Rdiaz

The strains that we are using are not known pathogenic to humans. They are commonly found in soils all over the world. That was an important consideration during the selection of the fungi and bacteria. Good comment!